Valley of the Rocks: Real Customer Reviews For 2024

Valley of the Rocks Customer Reviews

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Key Valley of the Rocks Details

Address: Porthdafarch Rd, Holyhead LL65 2LL
Website: https://www.bhhpa.org.uk/
Google Rating: 4.3
Number of Google Reviews: 57

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Valley of the Rocks Summary

The Valley of Rocks, located in North Devon, England, is a dry valley that runs parallel to the coast. It is a popular tourist destination known for its stunning landscape, geology, and feral goat population. The valley is situated about one kilometer west of the village of Lynton, and it is easily accessible by foot or car.

The Valley of Rocks is a unique geological formation that has been shaped by millions of years of erosion. It is home to a variety of rock formations, including towering cliffs, jagged pinnacles, and deep ravines. The valley’s rugged terrain is further accentuated by the presence of the Bristol Channel, which swirls beneath the cliffs. In addition to its geological features, the valley is also home to a diverse range of flora and fauna, including wildflowers, ferns, and a herd of feral goats.

Key Takeaways

  • The Valley of Rocks is a popular tourist destination known for its stunning landscape, geology, and feral goat population.
  • The valley is a unique geological formation shaped by millions of years of erosion, and it is home to a variety of rock formations, towering cliffs, jagged pinnacles, and deep ravines.
  • The valley is also home to a diverse range of flora and fauna, including wildflowers, ferns, and a herd of feral goats.

Geographical Location

Valley of the Rocks is a picturesque dry valley located in north Devon, England, about 1 kilometre (0.6 mi) to the west of the village of Lynton. The valley runs parallel to the coast and is part of the North Devon Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The valley is situated within Exmoor National Park and covers an area of about 70 hectares. It is known for its unique rock formations, which are made up of sandstone and shale. The valley is surrounded by steep cliffs, which rise up to a height of about 700 feet (213 metres) above sea level. The cliffs are home to a variety of wildlife, including feral goats, which can often be seen grazing on the vegetation.

Valley of the Rocks is situated on the South West Coast Path, which is a popular walking route that runs along the coast of Devon and Cornwall. The valley is also home to a number of footpaths, which provide visitors with access to the various viewpoints and rock formations.

The valley is a popular tourist destination and attracts visitors from all over the world. It has been the subject of many paintings, photographs, and poems, and has been featured in several films and television programmes. The valley is particularly popular with rock climbers, who come to climb the various rock formations.

Geological Features

Valley of the Rocks, located in North Devon, England, is a dry valley that runs parallel to the coast. It is a popular tourist destination, known for its unique landscape and geology. The valley is surrounded by high cliffs of hard Devonian Lynton Beds sandstones and shales, which have been eroded by the sea and weather to form the valley’s distinctive jagged rock formations.

The rocks at Valley of the Rocks are composed of sandstones and shales that were deposited in a marine environment during the Devonian period, approximately 400 million years ago. The rocks were then folded and faulted during the Variscan Orogeny, a mountain-building event that occurred around 300 million years ago.

The valley is home to a herd of feral goats, which are a popular attraction for visitors. The goats are believed to have been introduced to the area by the monks of nearby Oare Abbey in the 12th century. The goats have adapted to the harsh environment of the valley and are able to survive on a diet of heather and gorse.

The valley is also home to a variety of plant species, including heather, gorse, and bracken. The valley’s unique geology and landscape provide a habitat for a range of bird species, including peregrine falcons, kestrels, and buzzards. Visitors to the valley can enjoy a range of outdoor activities, including hiking, rock climbing, and birdwatching.

Overall, Valley of the Rocks is a unique and fascinating geological feature that provides a habitat for a range of plant and animal species. Its distinctive rock formations and rugged landscape make it a popular destination for tourists and outdoor enthusiasts alike.

Flora and Fauna

Valley of the Rocks is home to a diverse range of flora and fauna. The unique landscape and geology of the area provide habitats for a variety of plants and animals.

Flora

The valley is home to a range of plant species, including heather, gorse, bracken, and bilberry. These plants thrive in the acidic soil and are adapted to the harsh coastal environment. Visitors can also spot wildflowers such as harebells, primroses, and bluebells during the spring and summer months.

Fauna

One of the most notable inhabitants of Valley of the Rocks is the herd of feral goats. These goats are believed to have been introduced to the area during the Bronze Age and have since adapted to the rugged terrain. Visitors can often spot the goats grazing on the cliffs and rocky outcrops.

In addition to the goats, the valley is also home to a variety of bird species, including peregrine falcons, kestrels, and buzzards. These birds of prey can often be seen soaring above the valley, hunting for prey.

Other animals that can be found in the valley include badgers, foxes, and rabbits. The streams and rivers that run through the valley are also home to a variety of fish species, including brown trout and salmon.

Overall, Valley of the Rocks is a haven for wildlife enthusiasts and nature lovers. The diverse range of flora and fauna provides a unique and fascinating glimpse into the natural world.

Historical Significance

Valley of Rocks has a rich history dating back to the Bronze Age. The area was inhabited by early settlers who left behind evidence of their existence in the form of standing stones, hut circles, and cairns. These ancient structures can still be seen in the valley today and provide a glimpse into the lives of the people who lived there over 4,000 years ago.

During the medieval period, the valley was used as a hunting ground for the local lords and their guests. It was also a popular spot for smugglers who used the rugged terrain to hide their contraband. In the 18th century, the valley became a popular tourist destination and was visited by many famous writers and artists, including Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth.

Valley of Rocks played an important role in the development of rock climbing in the UK. In the late 19th century, climbers began exploring the cliffs and boulders in the valley, and many of the routes they established are still in use today. The valley also hosted the first ever international climbing meet in 1907, which was attended by climbers from across Europe.

During World War II, the valley was used as a training ground for soldiers preparing for the D-Day landings. The steep cliffs and rugged terrain provided an ideal environment for training in rock climbing, abseiling, and other essential skills.

Today, Valley of Rocks is a popular tourist attraction and is visited by thousands of people every year. Its rich history, stunning scenery, and unique geology make it a fascinating place to explore and learn about.

Tourist Attractions

Valley of the Rocks is a popular tourist destination in Lynmouth, England. The natural beauty of the area attracts visitors from around the world. Here are some of the top tourist attractions in the area:

Valley of the Rocks Walk

One of the most popular things to do in Valley of the Rocks is to take a walk along the coastal path. The walk offers stunning views of the sea and the rocks, and is a great way to explore the area. The walk is suitable for people of all ages and fitness levels, but it can be steep in places, so it’s important to wear appropriate footwear.

The Valley of Rocks Wildlife

The Valley of Rocks is home to a variety of wildlife, including wild goats, deer, and birds of prey. Visitors can take a guided tour of the area to learn more about the local wildlife, or simply explore on their own. The area is also home to a number of rare plants and flowers, making it a great destination for nature lovers.

The Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway

The Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway is a fun way to explore the area. The railway is the highest and steepest fully water-powered railway in the world, and offers stunning views of the surrounding countryside. Visitors can take a ride on the railway and enjoy the scenery, or simply watch the trains go by.

The Lynmouth Flood Memorial Hall

The Lynmouth Flood Memorial Hall is a museum dedicated to the devastating flood that occurred in 1952. The museum tells the story of the flood and its impact on the local community, and features a number of exhibits and artefacts. Visitors can learn about the history of the area and pay their respects to those who lost their lives in the flood.

Walking Trails

Valley of the Rocks is a popular destination for walkers and hikers. There are many walking trails in the area that offer stunning views of the surrounding landscape. The trails vary in length and difficulty, so there is something for everyone.

One of the most popular trails is the Valley of the Rocks Loop Walk, which is a 6.5-mile circular route that takes around 3 hours to complete. This trail takes you through the dramatic Valley of the Rocks, where you can see towering rock formations and stunning coastal views. The trail is challenging initially, but the views are worth the effort.

Another popular trail is the Coleridge Way, which is a 51-mile walking trail that takes you through the heart of Exmoor National Park. The trail starts in the village of Nether Stowey and ends in Lynmouth, passing through the Valley of the Rocks along the way. This trail is more challenging than the Valley of the Rocks Loop Walk, but it offers some of the most breathtaking views in the area.

For those who want a shorter walk, the Valley of the Rocks and Lynton Outer Loop is a 5.5-mile loop trail that takes around 2.5 hours to complete. The trail starts in Lynton and takes you through the Valley of the Rocks before returning to Lynton. This trail is moderately challenging and offers some great views of the surrounding landscape.

Overall, there are many walking trails in the Valley of the Rocks area that offer stunning views of the surrounding landscape. Whether you are an experienced hiker or a beginner, there is a trail for you.

Conservation Efforts

The Valley of the Rocks is a unique natural area that provides a habitat for a variety of plant and animal species. As such, it has been the focus of several conservation efforts aimed at preserving and protecting its natural beauty and ecological diversity.

One of the most significant conservation efforts in the Valley of the Rocks is the management of the area’s grazing land. The land is managed by the National Trust, which has implemented a grazing scheme that ensures that the area’s grassland remains in good condition. The scheme involves the careful management of the number of grazing animals in the area, as well as the timing and duration of grazing periods.

In addition to grazing management, the National Trust has also undertaken several other conservation projects in the Valley of the Rocks. These projects include the restoration of dry stone walls, the removal of invasive plant species, and the planting of native trees and shrubs.

The Valley of the Rocks is also a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), which means that it is legally protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. This designation recognizes the area’s importance as a habitat for several rare and endangered plant and animal species, including the Silver-studded Blue butterfly and the Peregrine falcon.

To further protect the area’s natural beauty and ecological diversity, the Valley of the Rocks has also been designated as part of the Exmoor National Park. This designation provides additional protection and management for the area, ensuring that it remains a beautiful and ecologically diverse landscape for future generations to enjoy.

Overall, the conservation efforts in the Valley of the Rocks have been successful in preserving and protecting the area’s natural beauty and ecological diversity. Through careful management and protection, the area remains a unique and important natural resource for both wildlife and people alike.

Cultural References

Valley of Rocks has been a source of inspiration for many artists and writers over the years. The wild and rugged beauty of the landscape has captured the imagination of visitors for centuries. Here are some cultural references related to the Valley of Rocks:

Literature

The Valley of Rocks has been mentioned in several literary works. One of the most famous is R.D. Blackmore’s novel “Lorna Doone”. The novel is set in the 17th century and follows the story of John Ridd, a farmer who falls in love with Lorna Doone, a member of a notorious family of outlaws. The Valley of Rocks is mentioned several times in the novel and is described as a place of wild beauty and mystery.

Art

The Valley of Rocks has also been a popular subject for artists. One of the most famous paintings of the valley is by the British artist Thomas Gainsborough. The painting, titled “Valley of Rocks”, was completed in 1783 and is now part of the collection of the National Gallery in London. The painting depicts the rugged landscape of the valley, with its towering rock formations and winding paths.

Music

The Valley of Rocks has also inspired musicians over the years. One of the most famous songs about the valley is “Valley of Rocks” by the British folk band Fairport Convention. The song was released in 1971 and is a tribute to the beauty of the valley. The lyrics describe the rugged landscape and the wild goats that roam the area.

Film

The Valley of Rocks has also been used as a location for several films over the years. One of the most famous is the 1978 film “The Land That Time Forgot”. The film is set on a mysterious island and features several scenes filmed in the Valley of Rocks. The rugged landscape and towering rock formations of the valley provided the perfect backdrop for the film’s prehistoric setting.

Future Prospects

Valley of the Rocks is a stunning natural wonder that has been attracting visitors for centuries. As a result, there are several prospects for the future of the area that could help to enhance the visitor experience and protect the environment.

One possibility is the creation of new walking trails that would allow visitors to explore more of the area. This could include trails that take visitors up onto the surrounding hills, providing stunning views of the valley below. Another option would be to create a visitor centre that would provide information about the history and geology of the area, as well as offering refreshments and other facilities.

In addition, there is potential for the area to be used for educational purposes. The unique geology of the valley means that it could be an excellent location for geological field trips, and there is also the opportunity to learn about the local flora and fauna. This could be particularly beneficial for schools and universities, as well as for amateur geologists and naturalists.

However, any development in the area must be carefully managed to ensure that it does not have a negative impact on the environment. This could include measures such as limiting the number of visitors to the area at any one time, or implementing sustainable tourism practices to reduce the impact of visitors on the local ecosystem.

Overall, there are several exciting prospects for the future of Valley of the Rocks that could help to enhance the visitor experience while also protecting the natural environment. With careful planning and management, it is possible to ensure that the area remains a beautiful and unique destination for generations to come.

Frequently Asked Questions

What can I see at the Valley of the Rocks?

Valley of the Rocks is known for its stunning rock formations and coastal views. Visitors can see herds of wild goats that roam the area and may even catch a glimpse of the resident feral Soay sheep. The valley is also home to a variety of bird species, including peregrine falcons, buzzards, and kestrels.

How long is the walk at Valley of the Rocks?

The walk at Valley of the Rocks is approximately 2.3 miles long and takes about an hour to complete. The walking paths are reasonably flat and simple to navigate, making it an easy hike for visitors of all ages and abilities.

What is the best time to visit the Valley of the Rocks?

The best time to visit the Valley of the Rocks is during the spring and summer months when the weather is mild and the area is in full bloom. The valley is typically less crowded during the weekdays than on weekends and bank holidays.

How do I get to the Valley of the Rocks?

The Valley of the Rocks is located near the town of Lynton in North Devon. Visitors can take the A39 to Lynton and follow the signs to the Valley of the Rocks car park. There is also a regular bus service that runs from Barnstaple and Minehead to Lynton.

Can I see goats at the Valley of the Rocks?

Yes, visitors can see herds of wild goats that roam the Valley of the Rocks. These goats are descendants of a herd that was introduced to the area in the 1800s and have since thrived in the rocky terrain.

What are the nearby attractions to the Valley of the Rocks?

The nearby attractions to the Valley of the Rocks include the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway, the Exmoor National Park, and the picturesque seaside town of Ilfracombe. Visitors can also explore the nearby towns of Barnstaple and Minehead, which offer a variety of shops, restaurants, and historical sites.


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