Talli-ho: Real Customer Reviews For 2024

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Key Talli-ho Details

Address: Prysiorwerth Uchaf, Bodorgan LL62 5EG
Website: https://www.talli-ho.co.uk/
Google Rating: 4.6
Number of Google Reviews: 18

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Talli-ho Summary

Talli-Ho is a traditional cry made by huntsmen to signal the sighting of a quarry. It is often used with directions like “away” and “back”. The term has its roots in French taïaut or tayaut, which evolved from Middle French ta-ho, formed from two onomatopoeic words: ta, the cry to stimulate the animals, and ho, a rallying cry.

Talli-Ho has gained popularity in popular culture, literature, art, and music. It has been used in various forms of media, including movies, TV shows, and books. The term has also been used as a name for various products, businesses, and services. Despite its widespread popularity, Talli-Ho has also been the subject of controversies, particularly in relation to animal rights issues.

Key Takeaways

  • Talli-Ho is a traditional cry made by huntsmen to signal the sighting of a quarry.
  • The term has gained popularity in various forms of media, including movies, TV shows, and books.
  • Despite its widespread popularity, Talli-Ho has also been the subject of controversies, particularly in relation to animal rights issues.

History of Tally-Ho

Tally-Ho is a term that has been used in the United Kingdom since the 1700s as a hunting cry to signal the other hunters that the prey had been spotted. The expression was adopted by British fox hunters to signify the start of the hunt. It is a cry used to excite hounds when hunting deer and may have originated in the second half of the 13th century by the concatenation of a two-word war-cry: taille haut, where “taille” is the cutting edge of a sword and “haut” means high or ‘raised up’ [1].

The term “Tally-Ho” was also used in the name of a roistering character in English theater, Sir Toby Tallyho (Foote, 1756), from French taiaut, cry used in deer hunting (1660s), from Old French taho, tielau [2].

The Tally Ho, which soon will be ending after more than half a century at that location, began in 1966. The first ad for the new tavern, announcing its opening that night, appeared in the Lancaster New Era on May 13, 1966. The ad described the Tally Ho as “Lancaster’s newest, most modern, and most beautiful cocktail lounge.” It was located at 205 N. Queen St., in a building that had previously housed the Clover Club and the White Horse Inn [3].

Over the years, the Tally Ho has become a landmark in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and has been known for its LGBT-friendly atmosphere. It has hosted events and performances by various artists, including drag shows, karaoke nights, and live music. Despite its popularity, the Tally Ho has faced challenges, including a fire in 2010 and a change in ownership in 2017. However, it has remained a beloved establishment in the community and will be remembered for its contributions to the local nightlife scene [4].

References:

  1. Wikipedia
  2. Etymonline
  3. Lancaster Online
  4. Tally Ho Facebook Page

Significance of Tally-Ho

Tally-Ho is a term commonly used in fox hunting, which is a sport that involves chasing a fox with the help of trained hounds. The term is used to alert the other hunters that the fox has been spotted. The origin of the term is not entirely clear, but it is believed to have originated from the French phrase ‘taïaut’, which was a cry used in deer hunting.

In addition to its use in fox hunting, Tally-Ho has also been used in other contexts. For example, it has been used as an exclamation or expression to signify excitement or enthusiasm. It has also been used in the military to signal a successful mission or operation.

Despite its varied uses, Tally-Ho remains most closely associated with fox hunting. The sport has a long history in the UK, and Tally-Ho has become an integral part of its culture. However, in recent years, there has been growing controversy surrounding the sport, with many animal welfare groups opposing it on ethical grounds.

Despite this controversy, Tally-Ho remains an important part of the UK’s cultural heritage. While its use in fox hunting may be on the decline, the term continues to be used in other contexts, and its historical significance cannot be denied.

Talli-Ho in Popular Culture

Talli-ho has been a popular phrase in British culture for centuries, and it has made its way into various forms of media and entertainment. Here are some examples of Talli-ho in popular culture:

Literature

Talli-ho is often used in literature, particularly in works that focus on hunting and the outdoors. For example, in the classic novel “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, the character of Toad frequently exclaims “Talli-ho!” when he is out on his adventures. The phrase is also used in the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, particularly in “The Adventure of the Copper Beeches.”

Film and Television

Talli-ho has been used in various films and television shows, often in scenes that involve hunting or the countryside. In the British television series “Jeeves and Wooster,” based on the novels by P.G. Wodehouse, the character of Bertie Wooster frequently exclaims “Talli-ho!” when he is out on his country estate. The phrase is also used in the classic film “The Sound of Music,” during the song “The Lonely Goatherd.”

Music

Talli-ho has even made its way into music. The phrase is used in the song “Tally Ho!” by The Clean, a New Zealand indie rock band. The song was released in 1981 and has since become a cult classic.

Overall, Talli-ho has become a popular phrase in British culture and has been used in various forms of media and entertainment. Its association with hunting and the outdoors has made it a beloved phrase for many who enjoy the countryside and the thrill of the hunt.

Variations of Tally-Ho

Tally-Ho is a term commonly associated with fox hunting, but its origins go back much further. The term was first used in the 18th century to signal the start of a hunt, but its use has since expanded to include a variety of situations.

Fox Hunting

In fox hunting, Tally-Ho is used to signal the sighting of a fox. The hunter who spots the fox will shout “Tally-Ho!” to alert the other hunters and the hounds. This signals the start of the chase and the hunters will follow the hounds as they track the fox.

Aviation

In aviation, Tally-Ho is used as a radio call to signal the sighting of another aircraft. This is used to avoid collisions and maintain safe distances between aircraft. The pilot who spots the other aircraft will radio “Tally-Ho” to alert air traffic control and other pilots in the area.

Military

In the military, Tally-Ho is used as a call to signal the sighting of the enemy. This was used in the past to alert troops to prepare for battle. The call has since fallen out of use in modern warfare.

General Use

Tally-Ho has also been used in a variety of other situations, such as in the game of bridge to signal a successful bid, or in theatre to signal the start of a performance. It has also been used as an exclamation of excitement or surprise.

Overall, Tally-Ho has a rich history and has been used in a variety of contexts over the years. Its versatility and adaptability have ensured its continued use in a variety of situations.

The Etymology of Tally-Ho

Tally-Ho is a phrase that has been around for centuries, and its exact origins are not entirely clear. However, there are a few theories about where the phrase comes from.

One theory is that Tally-Ho comes from the French phrase “taïaut,” which was used as a cry to excite hounds when hunting deer. This theory suggests that Tally-Ho may have originated in the 13th century as a concatenation of the two-word war-cry “taille haut,” where “taille” means the cutting edge of a sword, and “haut” means high or raised up. The phrase was later adopted by English foxhunters as a call to signal the start of a hunt.

Another theory is that Tally-Ho comes from the phrase “tally,” which means a notch or mark used to keep score. The phrase “tally-ho” may have been used to signal the completion of a task or the achievement of a goal, much like the ringing of a bell or the blowing of a whistle.

Regardless of its origin, Tally-Ho has become a well-known phrase in the English language, and it is often used to express excitement or enthusiasm. It is particularly associated with foxhunting, where it is used to signal the sighting of a fox. However, the phrase has also been used in other contexts, such as in the military and in aviation, where it is used to signal the start of a mission or operation.

Overall, the etymology of Tally-Ho is a fascinating topic, and there are many different theories about where the phrase comes from. While the exact origins of the phrase may never be known for sure, it remains an important part of English language and culture.

Talli-Ho in Literature

Talli-ho has been used in literature as a cry of excitement or encouragement during hunting scenes. It is often used to announce the sighting of the quarry. The term has been used in various forms of literature, including novels, plays, and poems.

In the novel “The Pickwick Papers” by Charles Dickens, tally-ho is used as a cry of excitement during a fox hunt. The characters shout “talli-ho!” as they chase after the fox. The phrase is also used in the play “The Rivals” by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, where one character exclaims “tally-ho!” during a hunting scene.

In the poem “The Hunting of the Snark” by Lewis Carroll, tally-ho is used as a warning cry during a hunt for a mythical creature. The characters shout “talli-ho!” to alert each other of the snark’s presence.

Talli-ho has also been used in various other works of literature, often in the context of hunting or pursuit. It is a term that is closely associated with the thrill of the chase and the excitement of the hunt.

Overall, tally-ho has become a well-known and recognisable phrase in literature, often used to convey a sense of excitement and adventure. Its use in hunting scenes has helped to cement its place in popular culture, and it continues to be used today in various forms of media.

Talli-Ho in Art

Talli-Ho has become a popular subject in the art world, with various artists capturing the essence of the phrase in their works. The phrase is often associated with fox hunting and has been used in various forms of art to depict the thrill of the chase.

One notable example of Talli-Ho in art is the Tally-Ho Art Gallery located in Brandon, South Dakota. The gallery features various artworks from local artists, including paintings, sculptures, and photographs. Some of the artworks depict the phrase in different contexts, while others use it as a title or a theme.

Apart from the Tally-Ho Art Gallery, the phrase has also been used in various art prints and wall art available on online marketplaces like Etsy and Fine Art America. These artworks feature different interpretations of the phrase, ranging from traditional hunting scenes to modern abstract designs.

In addition to visual art, Talli-Ho has also been referenced in literature and music. For instance, the phrase appears in the classic novel “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, where it is used to signify the beginning of the hunt. Similarly, the phrase has been used in various songs, including “Tally Ho” by The Clean, “Tally-Ho!” by The Lillingtons, and “Tally Ho” by The Wurzels.

Overall, Talli-Ho has become a popular and versatile phrase in the art world, inspiring various forms of creative expression. Whether it’s through paintings, sculptures, photographs, literature, or music, the phrase continues to evoke a sense of adventure and excitement.

Tally-Ho in Music

Tally-Ho has been used in various musical contexts throughout history. It has been used as a song title, a band name, and even as a music camp name.

Song Title

One of the most famous uses of Tally-Ho in music is as a song title. The Clean, a New Zealand band, released a song called “Tally Ho!” in 1981. The song is known for its catchy guitar riff and energetic beat, and it has become a cult classic among indie rock fans.

Band Name

Tally Ho! is also the name of a British band that was formed in the early 1980s. The band had a short-lived career, but they gained a small following in the UK with their unique blend of post-punk and new wave music.

Music Camp Name

Tally-Ho Music Camp is a music camp that was founded in 1948 in Honeoye, New York. The camp was designed for young musicians who wanted to improve their skills and learn more about music theory and performance. The camp was known for its high standards and rigorous training, and many successful musicians got their start at Tally-Ho Music Camp.

Overall, Tally-Ho has had a significant impact on the music industry, and it continues to be used in various musical contexts to this day.

Controversies Surrounding Talli-Ho

Talli-Ho, a former boys’ training farm in Victoria, Australia, has been the subject of numerous controversies over the years.

One of the most significant controversies is the physical and sexual abuse suffered by the children who were sent there. According to Jim Sherlock, a former resident of Talli-Ho, the abuse was so vicious that he buried it for years. The Victorian Education Department’s archival records and newspaper reports from the mid-20th century also document the abuse suffered by the children at Talli-Ho.

Another controversy surrounding Talli-Ho is its treatment of Aboriginal children. The Central Mission, which governed Talli-Ho, was responsible for the care of many Aboriginal children. However, the archival records suggest that the children were subjected to poor living conditions and inadequate education. The intersection of race, class, and gender in the treatment of Aboriginal children at Talli-Ho is a complex issue that has yet to be fully explored.

In addition to these controversies, the origin of the phrase “tally-ho” has also been a subject of debate. While some claim that it originated as a war cry in the 13th century, others argue that it was first used in the context of fox hunting. The true origin of the phrase remains unclear.

Overall, the controversies surrounding Talli-Ho serve as a reminder of the importance of protecting vulnerable populations and ensuring that institutions are held accountable for their actions.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Tally-ho is a term that originated in the 13th century as a war-cry. The term evolved over time and was used in fox-hunting to signal the presence of the quarry. It was also used in classical French to expose someone to public condemnation.

Today, Tally-ho is used as an exclamation to express excitement or enthusiasm. It is also used as a rallying cry in various sports and activities.

While the origins of Tally-ho are fascinating, the term has evolved over time and has taken on new meanings and uses. It is a testament to the power of language and how it can adapt and change with the times.

Overall, Tally-ho is an interesting term with a rich history and a range of uses. Whether it is used in fox-hunting or as a general exclamation, Tally-ho continues to be a popular term that is recognised across the world.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the meaning of ‘Pip pip tally ho’?

‘Pip pip tally ho’ is a phrase that was commonly used in the early 20th century in England as a way of saying goodbye. It was often used by pilots during World War I, and has since become a popular phrase associated with British culture.

What is the origin of the phrase ‘Tally Ho’?

The phrase ‘Tally Ho’ has its origins in fox hunting, where it was used to signal the sighting of a fox. It was later adopted by the military as a way of signalling the sighting of an enemy aircraft.

What is the significance of Tally-Ho cards?

Tally-Ho cards are a brand of playing cards that are known for their high quality and durability. They are often used by magicians and cardists due to their smooth handling and consistent performance.

What is the history of the Tally Ho Boat?

The Tally Ho Boat was a luxury yacht that was built in 1927 for the American businessman and socialite, Horace Dodge. It was later sold to the British Royal Navy during World War II, and was used as a training vessel for naval cadets.

What is the Tally Ho menu like?

The Tally Ho is a family-run pub in Hungerford, Berkshire, that offers a traditional British menu. The menu features classic pub dishes such as fish and chips, bangers and mash, and steak and ale pie.

What does the military term ‘Tally Ho’ mean?

In military terms, ‘Tally Ho’ is used as a way of signalling the sighting of an enemy aircraft. It is often followed by a description of the aircraft’s location and direction of travel.


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